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Fallen Servicemen and Women

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Guardsman Karl Whittle

 

Guardsman Karl Whittle, 22 years of age, from Bristol, leaves behind his parents, partner, and baby daughter.

 

He sustained gunshot wounds as a result of enemy action while he was manning a checkpoint in the Nar-e Saraj district of Helmand Province on August 14th 2012. After receiving medical treatment and being flown back to England and the Queen Elizabeth hospital, he survived until the 7th September 2012 when he finally succumbed to his wounds.

 

His family said in a statement:

"Karl was one in a million. He was a proud and caring man who took pride in whatever he did. The family are obviously devastated. Karl was the light of many lives and touched all who knew him. He will be especially missed by his baby daughter Grace, who has lost her number one man."

 

Lieutenant Colonel James Bowder, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, said:

"Guardsman Whittle was one of our very best. A great soldier and a young man of rare character, he was destined to go a very long way in the Army. Big, strong and full of fight, he battled hard against his injuries right to the very end.

I am immensely proud of what Guardsman Whittle achieved out here in Afghanistan and more broadly during his military career. He was utterly committed to his fellow Guardsmen, his Company and the mission. He will never be forgotten by either the Battalion or the broader Regimental family. Moreover, we are determined to maintain the high standards set by this most talented of Grenadiers."

 

Major Piers Ashfield, Captain of the Queens Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, said:

"Guardsman Whittle was one of the toughest soldiers in the Company and a loyal friend to everyone he met. His dedication to his duty through great adversity was of the highest order. The Queen's Company has lost a great soldier, who will forever be remembered for his inspiring bravery and sacrifice."

 

Lieutenant Alexander Budge, 3 Platoon Commander, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, said:

"Guardsman Whittle was without doubt a shining light in the Platoon. On arrival at the Battalion, shortly before tour, he immediately asserted himself and showed his true talent. He was kind, compassionate and an exceptional soldier, always ready to help others less proficient than himself. He was a mountain of a man with an extremely bright future, which makes his passing even harder to bear. I think it is a testament to his strength and determination that he fought this long against all odds. He was a professional to the end..."

 

 

 

 

He is the 426th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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A soldier from The Light Dragoons was killed in an IED strike in Afghanistan's Nar-e Saraj district earlier today (9th September 2012).

 

More details as I receive them.

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Sergeant Lee Paul Davidson

 

Sergeant Lee Davidson, 32 years of age, from Doncaster, leaves behind his wife, Samantha, sons, Jamie and Jayden, and unborn daughter.

 

Sergeant Davidson was on patrol with Afghanistan Uniformed Police in the Nar-e Saraj district of Helmand Province. His ridgeback, the rear vehicle in their patrol, struck an IED on the side of the road and he was fatally injured in the blast.

 

His wife said in a statement:

"My gorgeous husband Lee, we all can't believe you have gone. You are my best friend, lover and the best husband and father I could have ever wished for. You really are the total package - good looking, kind, loving, generous and the best dad I have ever known.

 

"Your memories we had together will be treasured in my mind and heart forever, your children will grow up knowing all this about you. You will never be forgotten. NEVER. All our love your Samantha, Jayden, Jamie and your little daughter whose on the way very soon. x"

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Sam Plant, Commanding Officer, the Light Dragoons, said:

"Sergeant Davidson will be remembered as a simply superb soldier and a wonderful man. From the outset of training for this, his second tour of duty in Afghanistan, he demonstrated the sort of professionalism and determination that had long been his trademark.

 

"He was the most natural leader of men and soldiers flourished under his command - he set the perfect tone and example and cared deeply for his soldiers' welfare. Rarely to be seen without a broad smile on his face, his enormous popularity was borne out of deep respect and his unbreakable sense of fun.

 

"Utterly loyal and ferociously hardworking, he was, and always will be, an inspiration to so many.

 

"Typically, Sergeant Davidson attacked this new challenge [of training the ANP] with gusto, quickly proving to be an outstanding mentor. The requirement to build rapport with his Afghan partners came completely naturally to him and he died doing a job in which he was succeeding and loving.

 

"His future in the Light Dragoons was full of promise, and continued promotion up the ranks was a given."

 

 

 

He is the 427th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Today, 14th September 2012, a soldier from 1st Battalion Grenadier guards was killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

 

He was killed when his vehicle struck an IED by the side of a road.

 

More information when I receive it.

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2 soldiers from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment were killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province, Afghanistan on Saturday 15th September 2012.

 

They were killed when a man wearing ANP uniform opened fire on them.

 

More details as I get them.

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Lance Corporal Duane Groom

 

Lance Corporal Duane Groom, 32 years of age, from Fiji, leaves behind his family [i couldn't find any mention of his family's make up or names - DE].

 

He was killed when the vehicle he was travelling in was struck by an IED in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

 

Lieutenant Colonel James Bowder, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards, said:

"Lance Corporal Groom was an outstanding soldier in every respect. Tough, keen, and unflappable, he was utterly committed to his fellows and the cause. We are all tremendously proud of what he achieved during his time in the Regiment, and particularly out here in Afghanistan where he contributed so much.

 

"His many friends and the broader Battlegroup will never forget this most talented of men. Moreover, we are determined to finish the mission that he so bravely helped to start."

 

 

 

Major Piers Ashfield, The Captain of the Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, said:

"Lance Corporal Groom was a dedicated soldier and devoted to the wellbeing of his family and friends. His unassuming approach and lightness of touch endeared him to everyone that was fortunate enough to have met him. He was the consummate professional; diligent, hard-working and unflinching in the face of any danger."

 

He is the 428th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Staff Sergeant Gareth Thursby and Private Thomas Wroe

 

 

 

They were both killed when they approached a man in an ANP uniform at checkpoint Tora in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Pronvince who said he was injured, when he open fired.

 

 

 

Sergeant Gareth Thursby, 29 years of age, from Skipton, leaves behind his wife, Louise, and two children, Joshua and Ruby.

 

His wife said in a statement:

"Gareth was the love of my life. He was an amazing husband and father, happy, full of life and kind hearted with a passion for his work and family. He was brave, hardworking, a loving husband who was a devoted father to his children. Our Hero."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Zachary Stenning, Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, said:

"We have lost one of our finest, Sergeant Gareth Thursby. His nickname 'Bull' epitomised everything; he was strong, confident and unbelievably robust. He was admired and deeply respected by his soldiers and peers for his soldiering skills, physical strength and forthright honesty. Utterly professional, his standards were legendary.

 

"Having been his Company Commander and now Commanding Officer, I know just how committed to soldiering he was. However, against the hard exterior there was a caring and most compassionate leader. I heard just a few weeks ago that he had told his Platoon to call him 'Dad' during the tour. That is how he saw himself; a father figure for 30 men and women involved in gruelling operations in Helmand. On the very few nights where he was not on patrol, but his men were, Sergeant Thursby would remain alert and awake until all his men returned safely.

 

"When there were dangerous moments, it was always Sergeant Thursby who could be found at the front, offering steadying words to his Platoon Commander and the young soldiers. Such dedication and indeed selfless love for his fellow soldiers is remarkable and testament to the qualities of this unique man."

 

 

 

Major Finlay Bibby, Officer Commanding, Alma Company, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, said:

"Sergeant Thursby was an inspiring man. His physical stature, extreme professionalism and uncomplicated outlook on life demanded respect, which is exactly what he got from his soldiers. He led from the front and set an example that could not be ignored. He was able to blend strong leadership with a genuine compassion for his men who adored him and referred to him as 'Dad'."

 

 

 

Private Thomas Wroe, 18 years of age, from Huddersfield, leaves behind his parents, Michael and Claire, his sister, Demi, and his girlfriend, Jessica.

 

His family said in a statement:

"Our son Thomas was a brave young soldier, who is loved by his family, girlfriend and friends. We can't believe you have been taken so soon from us. You will always be in our hearts for ever and ever. You would light up the room with your smile and bubbly personality. Our world will be a duller place without you. We are so proud of you son, on all you achieved and we are grateful for every special thing you gave us. We will always love you Tom."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Zachary Stenning, Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, said:

"Private Tom Wroe had only been with us a few months, but in this short period he had made a significant impression on his fellow soldiers and commanders. Always eager and with unrelenting energy, he had pushed hard to join the Regiment in Afghanistan.

 

"Arriving only some two months ago, his energy and professionalism quickly earned him the respect of his fellow team members. But it was his humour and character that really stood out. Whenever anyone asked how he was, his consistent reply was 'always happy'. This phrase captured the young man Wroe was. On patrol his professional skills were impressively high given his relative inexperience. When back in the isolated checkpoint, his humour and vibrancy shone through and energised those around him.

 

"His quick wit, love of Huddersfield Town Football Club, board games and genuine 'can do nature' made him a popular member of the team. He already had that unique quality of command presence that an Army requires; people looked to him for leadership in dangerous and difficult moments. I have no doubt he would have attended and passed our Junior Leader Course, way ahead of his time."

 

 

 

Major Finlay Bibby, Officer Commanding, Alma Company, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, said:

"Private Wroe made an immediate impression on joining Alma Company shortly before deploying to Afghanistan. His confidence, sense of humour and ever present smile made him hugely popular and fun to be with. Famously, he twice beat his Platoon Commander at Risk, a board game of military strategy, making him the 'Baby General'. He was an extremely talented soldier who was fulfilling his dream by serving with the Battalion on operations, the same Battalion that his father served with. I have no doubt that Private Wroe would have achieved great things in the Army."

 

 

 

Their deaths bring the total number of British casualties in Afghanistan to 430.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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2 soldiers, 1 from 28 Engineer Regiment and 1 from 104 Force Support Battalion, were killed in Afghanistan on Friday 21st September 2012.

 

Their deaths are not thought to be linked and no enemy action is thought to have contributed to their deaths.

 

More information as I get it.

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Sergeant Jonathon Eric Kups

 

Sergeant Jonathon Kups, 39 years of age, from Warwickshire, leaves behind his wife and three children.

 

His family collectively said:

"Jonathan was a wonderful husband and loving father to three children. He was a loyal man with a wide circle of friends, a devoted son, son-in-law, grandson and brother."

 

His children said:

"You're the best Dad; always in our hearts "our hero."

 

And his wife added:

"I love you now, forever and always and evermore."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Mark Smyth, Commanding Officer, 104 Force Support Battalion REME, said:

"Sergeant Jonathan Kups, or 'Koops' as he was known, arrived at the Battalion in 2011. A real character, his dry and quick witted sense of humour made him a pleasure to work with and he was extremely popular across all the ranks.

 

"A man of real substance, Sergeant Kups' maturity and considerable experience enabled him to quickly become a vital member of the Electronics Platoon. Without delay he made an immediate impact within his Company, developing and training his soldiers and ensuring that they were all fully competent and able to deliver essential electronics support in Afghanistan and back in the UK; his clear and dynamic leadership guaranteed success.

 

"He immersed himself in all aspects of Battalion and Company life and I swiftly recognised him as one of my 'go to' Senior Non-Commissioned Officers (SNCOs) when a task needed completing quickly, efficiently and to the highest standard.

 

"His loss will be felt across the entire Battalion."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Neil Thorpe, Commanding Officer, Theatre Equipment Support Battalion (4 Close Support Battalion REME), said:

"Sergeant Kups joined the Battalion in late January 2011 as we started the final preparations for our deployment on Operation HERRICK 16. From the start he made a strong impression.

 

"Technically brilliant, he invested considerable sweat and tears in developing his technicians ahead of the deployment and his efforts reaped significant success. At the centre of electronic repair in Theatre, he drove his team hard to ensure those soldiers deployed forward had the equipment they needed ??? he was never found wanting.

 

"Confident, with bags of humour, he was a SNCO who lived life to the full. His enthusiasm was infectious and he cared passionately for the technicians within his team. He was the father figure and his soldiers loved him for it.

 

"The Battalion and the Corps have lost a very talented SNCO. It is a privilege to have served with him.

 

"Arte et Marte."

 

 

 

He is the 431st British Casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Captain James Anthony Townley

 

Captain James Townley, 30 years of age, from Tunbridge Wells, leaves behind his parents, Peter and Jacqui, his brother, Nick, and his girlfriend, Helen.

 

He died of wounds in Camp Bastion, having sustained them at FOB Shawqat.

 

His family said in a statement:

"James was a wonderful, loving and caring son and brother. He was devoted to his girlfriend, Helen. He was our guardian angel and our hero. We were so proud of him. He touched every part of our lives and his loss has left a huge chasm that we can never fill.

 

"James will never be forgotten and always in our hearts and thoughts."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Chas Story, Commanding Officer, 28 Engineer Regiment, said:

"James was an exceptional officer, a great character and unbelievably clever. The Regiment is devastated that such a bright light has gone out - everyone knew him and it was impossible not to be drawn in by his passion and humour. He was on his third tour of Afghanistan and a volunteer for all three. He joined to be a soldier and he was determined to make the most of all the opportunities he could. The Regiment will be a poorer place without James.

 

"He was an outstanding individual and throughout his life he has made a massive difference to all those he encountered. He will never be forgotten."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Jack Nicholson, Commanding Officer, 21 Engineer Regiment, said:

"Captain James Townley was an enthusiastic, professional and extremely likeable young officer who made friends easily. Back in Afghanistan for his third tour, he had worked hard to prepare for the deployment and was looking forward to getting to grips with the challenges that lay ahead. In the time that I have known him, he was always cheerful, polite and full of energy - a real pleasure to command.

 

"His tragic loss has stunned the Regiment, and we are all trying to come to terms with this awful event. He had many friends throughout the Corps and his loss will be deeply felt by all those who had the privilege of serving alongside him."

 

 

 

He is the 432nd British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict so far.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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A Royal Marine died in Afghanistan on 25th September 2012. It is thought that he died of natural causes.

 

More details when I get them.

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Captain Carl Manley

 

Captain Carl Manly, 41 years of age, leaves behind his wife and 3 children.

 

His family said in a statement:

"To us, Carl was the loveliest husband and father. We can't imagine life without him; we are so very proud of him and everything he has achieved, both professionally and for the family.

 

"Always smiling, he never had a bad word to say about anyone. Everything he did was selfless, at work and at home. The world has lost a really special person."

 

 

 

His CO said:

"His combination of ferocious work ethic and humility ensured that he made a sustained contribution to ISAF [international Security Assistance Force] operations on this and his previous tours of Afghanistan. A highly valued Royal Marines officer, he will be missed by all those who worked with him."

 

His death, albeit from natural causes, brings the total number of British deaths in Afghanistan to 433.

 

We will remember them.

 

 

 

 

His family have requested that their privacy is respected.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Its nice to see you have a thread like this on here. I think you're one of the very VERY few communities who actually have a thread like this. Fair play to you.

 

 

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.

Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow.

They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,

They fell with their faces to the foe.

 

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning,

We will remember them.

 

I salute them all.

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A Royal Marine and a soldier from 3 Medical Regiment died in Afghanistan from wounds sustained during a patrol in the Nar-e Saraj district of Helmand Province on this day, Wednesday the 24th October 2012.

 

More information as I get it.

 

 

 

 

It's a stupid thing, but I feel almost like I'm responsible for these deaths. I was commenting to my friends that it was nice that I hadn't had to write in this thread for a long time. I feel like I jinxed it...

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Acting Corporal David O'Connor and Corporal Channing Day

 

They were conducting a patrol with other elements of Charlie Company, 40 Commando, and Afghanistan Local Police to conduct low level training with them when they came under fire from near a small village named Char Kutsa. During the engagement, Acting Corporal O'Connor was fatally wounded alongside his college and patrol medic, Corporal Day.

 

 

 

Acting Corporal David O'Connor, 27 years of age, from Hampshire, leaves behind his mother, Rosemary, Brother, Phil, Father, Roy (known to all as George), and his loving family.

 

His family made the following statement:

"David???s family and friends are greatly saddened by his loss and hope to be left to grieve privately."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Matt Jackson, Royal Marines, Commanding Officer, 40 Commando Royal Marines, said:

"This is an extremely sad time for 40 Commando Royal Marines, his friends and most of all his family. Corporal Dave O???Connor was one of the best; he was loved and respected by those around him and was relentless in the pursuit of excellence in his duties. Utterly professional, his four operational tours of Iraq and Afghanistan marked him as one of the most devoted individuals in the Commando. Brave, committed and humorous it is difficult to find words that can possibly fill the void which has been left by this truly excellent junior commander; his loss is difficult to comprehend. His career was dedicated to the service of his country and to the lives of the Royal Marines with whom he served.

 

"The Royal Marines that he leaves behind will continue to thrive on the enthusiasm he showed in every aspect of his role but their lives will always be marred by the sadness which comes with losing a great leader, a great companion and a great friend.

 

???Corporal O???Connor???s loss will be mourned across the Royal Marines by those who he knew and by those who can only aspire to be in some small way like him. He was exceptional and I am immensely proud to have had the privilege of serving alongside him both here and on Op Cougar."

 

 

Major Chris Hall, Royal Marines, Officer Commanding, Charlie Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines, said:

"Corporal Dave O???Connor was a fantastic, engaging and professional man who was universally popular and highly capable in all he did. He has been with Charlie Company for many years and was a stalwart of both the professional and social side of Company life. He was a veteran of Telic 4 and Herricks 7 and 12 and was very clear in his motivation for returning to Afghanistan for another tour. He wanted to lead his men and utilise his considerable experience to guide them through the next six months and leave Afghanistan a better country.

 

"Dave???s cutting, self deprecating wit, easy going manner and endearing personality will never be forgotten by all those who had the privilege and pleasure to have met and worked with him.

 

"He will never be forgotten."

 

 

Also, to my shame I rarely add in quotes from the lower ranks, but in this case I saw this one from Marine Tom Leigh, 8 Troop, Charlie Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines:

"...He was Charlie Coy down to his core, a true Spartan who will live on forever in our memories as he takes up his honorary place in the Spartan Bar. Stand easy, Dangerous Dave O???Connor, see you on the other side. The first round is on you..."

 

 

Corporal Channing Amanda Day, 25 years of age, from Wiltshire, leaves behind her parents, Rosemary and Leslie, her sisters, Lauren and Laken, and her brother Aaron.

 

Her family made the following statement:

"Channing was bubbly, sporty, beautiful and lived her life for the Army. She has died doing what she lived for and in the life that she loved. She will be remembered by all who knew her as a wonderful girl who never stopped smiling and who had an infectious laugh.

 

"Channing played football for Northern Ireland as well as ice hockey and also gained her qualification as a ski instructor through the Army. She was also the Northern Ireland Gymnastics Pairs Champion. A girl who lived her life to the full without ever giving up on her dreams.

 

"She was a fabulous daughter, sister, granddaughter, cousin, niece and friend. She will be so sadly missed by all."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Phillip de Rouffignac, Commanding Officer, 3 Medical Regiment, said:

"Corporal Channing Day was a star for the future. Although only 25, she had recently been promoted to Corporal, and her current operational experience in Iraq and Afghanistan made her a natural choice for the demanding role she was undertaking in support of 40 Commando Royal Marines. Diligent in every respect of her preparation, she had worked hard all the way through the build-up training and led by example in all that she did.

 

???Hugely popular with her friends in Preston, Catterick and in Afghanistan, Corporal Channing Day made the most of everything and had lived a lifetime in a short time. An Army footballer, she was a real team player in every sense. Corporal Day will be sorely missed..."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Matt Jackson, Commanding Officer, 40 Commando Royal Marines, said:

"Corporal Channing Day had clearly made a positive impact on Charlie Company Royal Marines and is spoken about with huge warmth and affection; she was an inspiration and example to all whom she met. Throughout her short time with 40 Commando Royal Marines she endeared herself to all that she worked alongside. Enthusiastic, popular and professional it was clear that she really was one of those rare people who could lighten the mood regardless of the situation. Highly competent she gave Charlie Company the confidence to patrol across a dangerous area knowing that she would be there to care for them if they fell ??? she was devoted to helping others.

 

???The loss of such an exceptional talent has come as a tragic blow..."

 

 

Major Paul Sandle, RAMC, Officer Commanding, Close Support (Task Force Helmand) Medical Squadron, 3 Medical Regiment, said:

"Corporal Channing Day joined Close Support (Task Force Helmand) Medical Squadron from 63 (Force Support) Squadron when 3 Medical Regiment re-structured into its Operation Herrick 17 configuration in early 2012. Channing was a very experienced Combat Medical Technician who had already served operational tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

???Channing had recently been promoted to the rank of Corporal and was enjoying the opportunity to lead the junior medics of 3/5 Troop who were working alongside 40 Commando Royal Marines as part of Transition Support Unit Nahr-e Seraj. Channing???s strong character, good nature and unique sense of humour were invaluable in contributing to the efforts of the Squadron. She was never one to shy away from a challenge, and would fully immerse herself in the task at hand, fully embracing the role of a close support medic.

 

???Channing was a dedicated and selfless medic who put the needs of others before her own."

 

 

Their deaths bring the total number of British casualties, from the Afghanistan conflict, to 435.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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2 soldiers from 1st Battalion, the Royal Gurkha Rifles, were killed in Afghanistan today, the 30th October 2012. They were killed at a checkpoint in the Nar-e Saraj district of Helmand Province by a man wearing ANP uniform.

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Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter and Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar

 

The two soldiers were in the Nar-e Saraj district of Helmand Province, Afghanistan, participating in a shura alongside members of the ANP. Once the shura was completed and they were leaving they were shot and killed by a rogue police officer.

 

 

 

Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter, 29 years of age, from Peterborough, leaves behind his mother, Helen, father, David, and sister, Emily.

 

His family made the following statement:

"Edward was fiercely loyal and totally sincere to his parents, sister and many friends who are mourning him today both in the UK and around the world. He loved the Gurkhas and died among friends doing the job that he wanted to do. Helen and David would appreciate being left to grieve in private."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel David Robinson, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, the Royal Gurkha Rifles, said:

"Our battalion has lost a character, a true gentleman and an inspirational leader in Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter. Edward or 'DB', as he was often known, was one of life's true personalities; his Gurkha soldiers noticeably responded to his dedication to them but also to his great wit and humour. They would follow him anywhere.

 

"His natural empathy and rapport for his soldiers was evident to everyone; it was never a surprise to find him spending additional time with them, whether seeking to further their professional development or just enjoying their company. The tragedy of his loss is beyond words.

 

"He was also utterly courageous and had already proved himself such a calm and steady leader under fire that his men knew they were in the best of hands. Since joining the regiment in 2010, he had quickly shown that he thoroughly enjoyed the challenges of command and, I know, was incredibly proud to be leading his platoon of Gurkhas. Despite the inherent dangers of the operation, he focused his time and considerable efforts to their welfare and in delivering professional excellence in pursuit of the mission.

 

"He will be sorely missed by all who knew him. His brother officers will always remember him for his style, kindness and sense of fun and he truly endeared himself to all ranks as it was impossible not to be won over by his charm and positive personality. He combined his natural leadership with a mature, dedicated outlook and this was never more apparent than when he prepared his platoon for the challenges of the tour. I could not have been more proud of him.

 

"Edward Drummond-Baxter was a Gurkha officer in the finest tradition and his loss will be deeply felt by all those who had the privilege and honour of knowing him."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Matt Jackson, Royal Marines, Commanding Officer, 40 Commando Royal Marines, said:

"Edward was a remarkably talented officer. He readily accepted the challenges placed before him and was so demonstrably proud to be serving in Delhi Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles. I saw at first hand the way in which he capably led his men through the training prior to deployment and the way that his Gurkhas responded to his leadership style; they had clearly made an exceptional bond.

 

"He had already proved to be highly effective in the time he was deployed in Afghanistan and will be remembered for his passion and bravery and his commitment to those he so ably led; his reputation as a leader, commander and warrior were known. He loved the men he served alongside and in turn they loved him; leaders like Edward are born to achieve greatness and it is with deep sadness that we find that his life has been cut so tragically short.

 

"It is difficult in these few words to truly reflect how exceptionally talented Edward was, but I will say this: I am proud. I am proud to say that I knew him. I am proud to have served alongside him. I am proud to have had such a highly talented Gurkha officer serve as part of 40 Commando Group Royal Marines."

 

 

 

Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar, 28 years of age, from Pokhara, Nepal, leaves behind his mother, Krishna, his father, Shyam, stepmother, Chhali, four sisters, Shova, Shyandya, Smita and Sardha, and his elder brother, Bhumpendra.

 

His family made the following statement:

"We are deeply shocked, disheartened and in disbelief that Siddhanta is no longer with us But we shall treasure all the good things he did. He enjoyed immensely of his profession and was fully committed towards it. He has made us proud. The whole family misses him dearly."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel David Robinson, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, the Royal Gurkha Rifles, said:

"Siddhanta Kunwar was a great character and a tough, professional Gurkha soldier with a proven and impressive operational record. Strong and highly experienced, he stood out from the crowd not only as a highly capable sniper but also for his smile and sense of fun, whatever the situation he found himself in.

 

"On this, his third tour of Afghanistan, he knew the dangers and understood better than most what it meant to do his job at the toughest end of soldiering. As such he was a role model for the younger soldiers around him. They, in turn, responded greatly to his guidance and experience but also to his caring nature. Away from operations, he loved his sport and was a great team player; he loved nothing more than having fun with his mates on the sports field.

 

"Siddhanta was a proud soldier and was immensely proud to be a Gurkha. He was one of the cornerstones of the Sniper Platoon where he was part of a close-knit team who were justifiably confident in their ability. He would have done anything to support his comrades and friends around him; I know they will miss him deeply.

 

"The Regiment has lost a fine young man who epitomised all that makes the Gurkhas so special. Living always so far from home, Gurkha units are particularly close-knit and the loss of Lance Corporal Siddhanta is a bitter blow, felt keenly by all ranks and families of 1RGR."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Matt Jackson, Royal Marines, Commanding Officer, 40 Commando Royal Marines, said:

"Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar epitomised everything that a Gurkha should be; he was dedicated, professional and brave. This was his third deployment to Afghanistan and he was continuing to excel in everything that he did, but especially in his role as a sniper, where his field-craft skills were beyond reproach. It is clear that he thrived on the challenges that operations bring and enjoyed using the skills that he worked so hard to gain; he was never found wanting. He demonstrated the highest qualities of a Gurkha soldier and his legacy lives on in Delhi Company.

 

"It is a huge privilege for me personally to command a Company of Gurkhas and to have known Lance Corporal Siddhanta, however briefly. We took him, and have taken Delhi Company, into the Commando family as one of our own. His loss will therefore not only be felt by the Brigade of Gurkhas and Delhi Company but also by everyone serving within 40 Commando Group Royal Marines. His sacrifice will never be forgotten and he will always be in our thoughts."

 

 

Their deaths bring the total number of British casualties in the Afghanistan conflict to 437.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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At 9.50am on Sunday 12th of November 2006 Remembrance Sunday. A IED went off on the banks of the Shatt al-Arab waterway in Basra,my Auntie Sharron lost her life in this incident.May Sharron and the millions of other service men & women who have given there life for King,Queen & Country be in our thoughts at this time of year.

 

May the All Rest in peace..

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To those who are left behind. The fallen are at peace, we who remain bare the true scars of war. The mothers, sisters, brothers, friends. Those who have seen the horrors of war but were not touched by deaths hand. Those of us who have seen so much, gave so much and bore so much. Today isn't a day to remember our dead, its a day for the ones who loved them they left behind.

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On Monday, 11th November 2012, a soldier from 1st Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland was killed in Afghanistan's Nad 'Ali district of Helmand Province.

 

If I had know about this on the day I would have said something in the op, but the MOD have only just released the article.

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WALTERBARRIE.jpg

Captain Walter Barrie

 

Captain Barrie was taking part in a football match with local ANA soldiers whom he was helping train in accordance with the UK's mentoring tasks in Afghanistan. During the match, a rogue ANA soldier attacked and fatally wounded him.

 

 

 

Captain Walter Barrie, 41 years of age, from Glasgow, leaves behind his wife, Sonia, and son, Callum.

 

His family made the following statement:

"Captain Walter Barrie was great man, a doting and amazing father and a fantastic husband. He was much loved and will be missed by many. The family would ask that their privacy is respected during this very difficult time."

 

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Wrench, Commanding Officer, The Royal Scot Borders, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment Scotland, said:

"My Battalion and our Regiment have lost both a soldiers? soldier and an officers? soldier. Captain Walter Barrie was a dedicated husband to his wife Sonia and a loving father to his teenage son Callum. As a soldier he was an experienced and highly professional infanteer. As a fellow officer he was a loyal, enthusiastic leader of soldiers and supportive brother officer.

 

"His career was dominated with deployments on operations and training our future soldiers and officers. He served his country on operations in Iraq, Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, and he was currently deployed on his second tour of duty in Afghanistan. His youthful drive and zest for life played out through his participation in many sports. As a keen skier and a Football Association Coach he not only played sport for his own satisfaction but also to spread the passion for these sports. His role as an advisor to the Afghan Army was one he trained for, looked forward to and performed superbly. His ability to build relationships and rapport has always made an impact on those who met him. This was down to his enthusiasm for life, for youth and humanity. As can be seen from the many tributes, he enriched the lives of everybody he came across. His winning personality and Glaswegian wit will be sorely missed as will the banter we often had as a result of his fanatical support for Glasgow Rangers.

 

"It is almost impossible to express the sadness we as a close Battalion are experiencing at this time. I know the impact of his tragic loss will be felt across our Regiment, amongst the soldiers, officers and in particular the Late Entry Commissioned Officer community. But we remain committed in our role and mission in Afghanistan and we will do so knowing that Walter would expect nothing less of us all."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Philip Kimber, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, The Mercian Regiment, said:

"Captain Walter Barrie served in the Kandak Advisory Team in Transition Support Unit Nad-e Ali. He worked closely with 1 MERCIAN Headquarters based in FOB Shawqat.

 

"Walter very quickly became a close colleague and friend to all in 1 MERCIAN. Charismatic and full of life, he immediately became one of the central characters in the FOB. He was always cheerful, positive and willing to give up his time for a chat. He embraced all equally, whether Mercian, Jock or Afghan Army.

 

"It was evident that experience and professionalism flowed though him. His calm, thoughtful approach inspired confidence in others. In the short time we knew him we learnt a huge amount from him. He was a genuine pleasure to work with and be around.

 

"Every day he could be seen running around the FOB at a pace that most private soldiers would struggle to keep up with. His love of football was obvious to all.

 

"Captain Walter Barrie will be fondly remembered by all the officers and soldiers in this Transition Support Unit."

 

 

 

He is the 438th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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