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Evans D

Fallen Servicemen and Women

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A soldier from the 1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment was killed whilst training on the Castlemartin RAC Range on 2nd May 2012.

 

An Army spokesman said: ?It is with regret that we can confirm that on May 2, 2012, Ranger Michael Maguire died at the Castlemartin Ranges. Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time.?

 

His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Colin Weir said: ?Ranger Maguire joined the 1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment on 10 May, 2010, just prior to deploying to Afghanistan in September, 2010. The entire Battalion is deeply shocked by this tragic event and all our thoughts and prayers are with Ranger Maguire?s family at this difficult time. He was a deeply professional and likeable young man and will be sorely missed.

 

While his Company Commander, Major Richard Bell said: ?One of our very best, his loss has devastated everyone who knew him. Michael was always going to stand out from the crowd. Not only because he stood a towering 6? 7?? tall, but because of his vastly cheerful outlook on life, natural charisma and irrepressible good humour. All of this ensured that he was extremely popular throughout the company and his loss is keenly felt.?

 

Gorffwys mewn Heddwch

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Thanks, Morris. I didn't see that one on the MOD website.

 

mi_2211560i.jpg

Ranger Michael Maguire

 

 

 

I have found very little that information that is different from what Morris has said bellow, so I hope he will not mind if, for the sake of keeping my posts here coherent, I simply quote him to tie that post in with the above picture.

 

 

 

 

 

A soldier from the 1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment was killed whilst training on the Castlemartin RAC Range on 2nd May 2012.

 

An Army spokesman said:

?It is with regret that we can confirm that on May 2, 2012, Ranger Michael Maguire died at the Castlemartin Ranges. Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time.?

 

His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Colin Weir said:

?Ranger Maguire joined the 1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment on 10 May, 2010, just prior to deploying to Afghanistan in September, 2010. The entire Battalion is deeply shocked by this tragic event and all our thoughts and prayers are with Ranger Maguire?s family at this difficult time. He was a deeply professional and likeable young man and will be sorely missed.

 

While his Company Commander, Major Richard Bell said:

?One of our very best, his loss has devastated everyone who knew him. Michael was always going to stand out from the crowd. Not only because he stood a towering 6? 7?? tall, but because of his vastly cheerful outlook on life, natural charisma and irrepressible good humour. All of this ensured that he was extremely popular throughout the company and his loss is keenly felt.?

 

Gorffwys mewn Heddwch

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The bad news keeps flowing today, with the announcement of another 2 deaths in Afghanistan.

 

2 soldiers, who have not yet been named to the public due to their families wishes for a period of grace, from the Royal Logistics Corps were killed in Helmand Province on Friday 4th May 2012.

 

The soldiers were attached to 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh Battlegroup and were serving in Combined Force Burma when their FOB (Ouellette) came under enemy indirect fire in the northern part of the Nahr-e Saraj district.

 

 

 

More details as and when it comes available.

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Corporal Andrew Steven Roberts and Private Ratu Manasa Silibaravi

 

Corporal Andrew Steven Roberts and Private Ratu Manasa Silibaravi were killed on Friday, May 4th 2012 by an indirect fire attack on FOB Oullette in the Nahr-e Saraj region of Helmand Province. They were soldiers from the Royal Logistics Corps attached to 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment and serving as part of Combined Force Burma.

 

Corporal Andrew Roberts, 32 years of age, from Middlesbrough, leaves behind his girlfriend, Paula, daughters, Jessica and Kayla, and son, Kyle. He was commanding an Advanced Search Team in the Operations section of the Explosive Ordinance Disposal and Search Task Force. As an Advanced Search Team commander he was responsible for leading his men in detecting IEDs in high risk areas.

 

In performing this role he undoubtedly saved many lives. Both British and Afghan.

 

His children, and family as a whole, said in a statement:

"For our brave Dad who went away to build sand castles and stop the bad men hurting people. We love you to the moon and back. You are an angel in Heaven now looking down on us all, we wish yesterday had never happened and you were still here to phone us and take us out. You were the best Dad, we remember all the fun things we did, we will never forget you and will love you forever. You are our Hero and we will pray for you always."

 

Paula made the following statement:

"Andrew truly was a hero and I'm so proud of what he achieved, he was such a special, kind and caring person. I was blessed to have spent the past two and a half years with Andrew. He made me and my son Josh so happy. I have lost my soul mate and my best friend. The memories I have of our time together I will hold in my heart forever. Sweet dreams my hero all my love always."

 

Lieutenand Colonel Simon Bell, Commanding Officer Explosive Ordinance Disposal and Search Task Force said:

"The tragic loss of Corporal Roberts has deeply shocked the Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Search Task Force and I am sure will have a similar effect on his home unit, 23 Pioneer Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps.

"A talented Junior Non Commissioned Officer, Corporal Roberts had leadership qualities in spades. He was fit and determined and set exactly the right example, truly inspiring his subordinates to do their very best.

"During demanding times, both physically and mentally, here in Afghanistan, Corporal Roberts continually stepped up to the plate and proved entirely worthy of the authority and responsibility bestowed upon him as a Corporal. His upbeat, determined nature balanced with humour, humility and understanding allowed him to command his Advanced Search Team extremely effectively. His team were utterly reliable due to his professionalism and leadership abilities."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dom Fletcher, RLC Commanding Officer 23 Pioneer Regiment RLC said:

"Corporal Andrew Roberts, known to everyone as 'Ginge', is a man I am proud to say I knew well. This junior commander was the epitome of a Pioneer soldier; brave, fit, robust and a 'salt of the earth character', who led his soldiers from the front and by example at all times. Ginge had a very infectious and engaging sense of humour, that made him hugely popular with all ranks and he could lighten any dark moment with his cheeky wit and northern banter. He was a selfless man and one of complete integrity. He took great pride in his role as the Section Commander of an Advanced Search Team serving with the Counter IED and Search Task Force in Afghanistan and he was always looking out for the welfare of his soldiers. 'Ginge' is quite simply irreplaceable, and all of us in 23 Pioneer Regiment will miss him terribly.

Corporal 'Ginge' Roberts volunteered to deploy as an Advanced Search Team Commander an Op HERRICK 16, despite knowing the risks of operating in this role.True to his usual enthusiastic, gritty and positive character, he wanted to be at the 'sharp end' on operations with his soldiers, where he could instil his professional standards and safeguard his troops in this demanding role. He died amongst his blokes, in the field, doing the job he loved."

 

Private Ratu Manasa Silibaravi, 32 years of age, from Fiji, he leaves behind his brothers, Saimoni, Kaveri and Ratumeli, sisters, Mereoni, Salote and extended family.

 

He had a busy career in the Army, with deployments to Iraq in 2003 and Afghanistan in 2006 and 2009. He completed public duties at Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace and the Tower of London. He was a promising athlete, in particular running, who represented his regiment at athletics.

 

Lieutenand Colonel Simon Bell, Commanding Officer Explosive Ordinance Disposal and Search Task Force said:

"The terrible loss of Private Silibaravi has come as a shock to all of us in the Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Search Task Force and I know that it will affect his parent unit, 23 Pioneer Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps in a similar manner.

"A quiet, yet determined and popular soldier, Private Silibaravi was a professional and committed individual. Strong and fit, he had an excellent work ethic, throwing himself wholeheartedly at every challenge. The number of operational tours that he had successfully completed is testament to his dedication and professionalism.

"Quite new to the specialist role of an Advanced Searcher, Private Silibaravi was nonetheless showing significant potential and promise for the future. He had easily taken on the skills required to add value to a team employed in the finding of deadly Improvised Explosive Devices in order that they can be safely disposed of. In the harsh and demanding conditions faced here in Afghanistan, his quiet confidence and clear inner strength had a positive, calming effect on those around him."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dom Fletcher, RLC Commanding Officer 23 Pioneer Regiment RLC said:

"Private Ratu Silibaravi was one of my most experienced soldiers. Steadfast, redoubtable and brave, this soldier was a Pioneer to his core. A man of strong belief and affable character, he was immensely popular in the Regiment and a highly valued member of his Search team.

"Private Ratu Silibaravi was a obvious choice when volunteers were required to train for the high risk role of Advanced Search in Afghanistan. With his broad operational experience, and his superb soldiering skills, he quickly established himself as an invaluable member of his section. Intelligent and thoughtful by nature, he was highly professional and always gave 100% to any task he was given. He died amongst his friends, on operations in a role that is vital to achieving progress in Afghanistan and highly regarded by all deployed UK forces."

 

These deaths bring the number of British casualties from the Afghanistan conflict to 412.

 

 

We will remember them...

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Corporal Brent John McCarthy and Lance Corporal Lee Thomas Davies.

 

On Saturday, 12th May 2012, Corporal Brent McCarthy (Royal Air Force) and Lance Corporal Lee Davies (1st Battalion Welsh Guards) were killed by rogue Afghan National Police officers at the local police headquarters near PB Attal in the Lashkar Gah area of Helmand Province as they were carrying out duties as part of the Police Advisory Team.

 

Corporal Brent John McCarthy, 25 years of age, from Hannover (Germany), but calling Telford his homestead when he moved to England, leaves behind his father, John, mother, Sarah, sister, Jodie, partner, Sarah, and niece and nephew, Miajay and Kyron.

 

His family said in a statement:

"Brent was a loving sensitive young man. He excelled at sport and had the whole world in front of him. He loved his family dearly and will always be a hero to his niece Miajay. Brent will be sadly missed not only by us but also by his loving partner Sarah and her devoted family. Life will never be the same for any of us. We will love you always. God bless."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dino Bossi, Commanding Officer, Police Mentoring and Advisory Group, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"His intelligence, ready wit and his desire to muck in and take part in all aspects of communal life meant that he fitted seamlessly into an extremely tight team. Corporal McCarthy was extremely popular and hugely respected among the men with whom he lived and fought - not always an easy trick for a military policeman from another Service, but one he achieved with ease and some style.

"Ever to the fore and sharing danger and discomfort, his light-hearted approach to life, easy going nature and cool professionalism made him a natural advisor to the Afghan National Police."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Alex Potts, Commanding Officer, Combined Force Lashkar Gah, said:

"Corporal Brent McCarthy was doing a difficult and dangerous job and he did it well. He was a fine ambassador for The Royal Air Force and we will remember him for his professionalism, physical toughness, but above all, for his unbeatable smile and sense of humour."

 

Squadron Leader Carl Jeffery, Officer Commanding 7 (Royal Air Force Police) Squadron, Royal Air Force Brize Norton, said:

"Cpl Brent McCarthy was fiercely loyal and courageous, exemplifying the character of the Royal Air Force Police. Cpl McCarthy was a young man with huge potential: intelligent, determined and extremely capable, he was a highly popular figure within his Flight and was firmly on the path to great success in his career.

"Cpl McCarthy fully embraced all aspects of Service life, whether representing the RAF playing Hockey or getting his mates together for a beer, he was always a prominent figure who will be sorely missed by his friends, his colleagues and all those who had the honour of serving with him.

"Dynamic and with an enormous sense of fun, Cpl McCarthy's infectious enthusiasm could be relied upon to cheer those who were down, to inspire those who were lost and to comfort those in despair. It is great testament to Cpl McCarthy's character that despite a few brief years in the Service, he can claim so many friends amongst his Trade, his Station and the RAF as a whole."

 

Lance Corporal Lee Thomas Davies, 27 years of age, was from Carmarthen. His family have expressed wished to be left anonymous so they can grieve at this challenging time.

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dino Bossi, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"Lance Corporal Lee Davies loved being a soldier - it was who he was. He passed out from the Infantry Training Centre Catterick in April 2010. He swiftly made a name for himself for his enthusiasm, fitness and professionalism as an infantry soldier and in less than two years was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal.

"To have made such a profound impact so early in his Army career speaks volumes about the quality of the man we have lost today. Lance Corporal Davies was very much the up and coming Junior Non-Commissioned Officer; he had big plans and the personal qualities to make his ambitions a reality.

"In his personal life Lance Corporal Davies was a live wire who enjoyed nothing more than a night on the town. He was the living embodiment of the Army's work hard, play hard ethos.

"On duty he was a consummate professional; whether 'strutting his stuff' on public duties in London or on operations here in Afghanistan. It is in Afghanistan that the depths of his talents became obvious to all."

 

Major Julian Salusbury, Company Commander, Number 2 Company, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"Lance Corporal Davies was an outstanding Welsh Guardsman. Newly promoted after little more than two years service, he made the jump from guardsman to junior non-commissioned officer with characteristic flair, professionalism and not a little good humour.

"And that marked him out as a man - cheerfulness in the face of adversity; a ready smile and a friendly word. His catch phrase, first heard by me in the pouring rain and cold of Aldershot training area, 'I love my job', was not only said to raise his friends' morale but it was also the truth. Lance Corporal Davies loved being a guardsman and was the proudest of proud Welsh Guardsmen.

"Committed, capable and thoroughly dependable, he well understood his role in Afghanistan. He could not have been more suited to helping the Afghan police achieve a better, safer life for the Helmandi people. Considerate and utterly selfless, Lance Corporal Davies accepted the inherent risks of being a soldier and has paid the ultimate price."

 

 

Their deaths bring the total number of British casualties in Afghanistan to 414.

 

 

We will remember them...

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Wow, that's pretty scary... A Sergeant Luke Taylor died? He seems a lot like our Taylor. I hope there's no relation.

 

We don't have a lot of news over here on American deaths. I think at a certain point everyone would just rather pretend there isn't a war on, so it's a fairly unreal situation. I say that everyone here is doing the men overseas no justice by forgetting that they're there. It would be nice to have the media report the war in other ways than saying, "A bomb went off in Afghanistan today, killing three and wounding ten." It'd be nice if they showed faces and names rather than just calling them "killing three".

 

However, if I do come across a news article on a recent US casualty, it'll be up here. I'm just hoping no one I know shows up. I've actually got two overseas, one of them a direct friend and the other a friend through relations. The first is a Dutch paratrooper by the name of Bas. I don't remember if he's schedualed for another tour, but here's hoping his time is up, as he's already been over there more than a few times before. The second is the husband of an old friend of mine, forgot his name. I think it was 'Gav', but I'm not terribly sure on that. Either way, I'm hoping that neither of the two are ever listed as casualties.

Edited by O'Dette
Incomplete

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On the 26th May 2012, a soldier from 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh was killed in the Nar-e Saraj region of Helmand province. He was killed when the vehicle he was travelling in suffered and IED strike.

 

More information as I receive it.

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Captain Stephen James Healey

 

Captain Stephen James Healey, 29 years of age and from Cardiff, was killed as the vehicle he was travelling in was hit by an IED in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He was commanding the Combined Force Burma reconnaissance platoon when the incident took place. He leaves behind his father, John, mother, Kerry, Brother, Simon, and girlfriend, Thea.

 

His family said in a statement:

"Stephen was all you could wish for in a son, brother, uncle and friend. He will be sadly missed by us all. He managed to do more in his 30 years than most people do in a lifetime."

 

His girlfriend said:

"Stephen will always be in my heart. I will miss him so much, he was my love, my life and my everything. Now he rests in peace, he was living the life he wanted to do with his men."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Webb, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh said:

"Captain Stephen Healey will be remembered by the Officers and Soldiers of 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh as one of the most charismatic and professional leaders any of us will have had the privilege of serving with.

"As the Recce Platoon Commander he cared deeply for his soldiers and they, in return, loved and respected him. And it was very easy to respect him. He had a calm, assured nature, an understated charm and the sort of personality that made it so easy to warm to him so very quickly ??? quick-witted and sharp his personality lightened any conversation.

"Tactically astute, clear-thinking and tremendously brave he was an excellent Platoon Commander. Already awarded a Mention in Despatches for his bravery on Op HERRICK 11, he was deeply committed to his role here on Op HERRICK 16 and he relished the challenge of bringing the best out of those around him, something he excelled at because he led from the front in everything that he did.

"As if all this wasn't enough, Steve was also committed to raising money for charity and in the latest of many events, only 3 weeks before deployment, he organised and took part in a blindfolded walk from our barracks in Chester to Llandudno to raise money for Blind Veterans UK. This was so very typical of him: generous of spirit and genuinely compassionate."

 

Major Charlie Carver, Officer Commanding A Company, 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh said:

"Captain Steve Healey was a genuine pleasure to know. He was charismatic and full of life, always putting others before himself and as a result was loved by those he commanded. He was incredibly professional in all that he did and he was a natural leader. He was always to be found in the centre of the action, be that on the football field, leading his men or out in Cardiff.

"In his short time in the Battalion he demonstrated courage, determination and resolve whilst always getting the best out of each and every situation. In short he had become the epitome of a Royal Welshman."

 

He is the 415 British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Rest in peace, I can't express how greatful and how much sorrow I have in words.

Edited by Rec Simon

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Indeed, we shall remember.

 

In the meantime, I have a bone to pick with American media. As you all know, yesterday was Memorial Day in the US, and when I turn the television on what do I find? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. Only one channel of several cable channels was running something worthwhile (Band of Brothers, not even on HBO's channel!), and the rest were running normal programming. Heck, even the History Channel was doing the Hatfield-McCoy feud. Pardon me, but how does that have to do anything with fallen veterans? All I see is an asinine little skirmish in backland America between two families.

 

Am I the only one who is frustrated by the lack of coverage here? Do they want us to forget we're fighting in a war?

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What else can one say :-(

At ease soldier, your service is done...and shall be remebered.

 

A place to follow the sad news would be here:

http://www.arrse.co.uk/afghanistan-144

 

There is an automated RSS-feed from the MoD about casualties.

Isn't it sad that you need something like that, and yet society as a whole doesn't seem to give a f***

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First thing that comes on my screen at work is the butchers bill. We had a lull of activity in 2011 but it seems the insurgency has upped its game in 2012

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On the 1st June 2012, a soldier from 1st Battalion, the Royal Welsh was killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province. He was fataly wounded and, although he recieved treatment very soon after the event, he succumbed to his injuries.

 

More information as I receive it.

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Corporal Michael John Thacker

 

Corporal Michael John Thacker, 27 years of age, from Coventry, leaves behind his wife, Caroline, 2 year old daughter, Millie, father, David, mother, Alison, and brothers, Mark and Ashley. He served in 1st Battalion, the Royal Welsh.

 

He was killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province on Friday the 1st of June 2012 after being fatally wounded in a gunfight. He received treatment for his wounds and was evacuated via helicopter but the medics could not save him and he sadly succumbed to his wounds.

 

His wife said in a statement:

"Michael was the love of my life. He was an amazing husband and father who will always be remembered as a funny, loving and kind man. Everyone who met Mike instantly liked him and through time came to love him."

 

His brother, also named Michael and also serving in the 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh, at the rank of Lance Corporal, said:

"Corporal Michael Thacker is my big brother and the best I could wish for. We were more than brothers, we were best friends and words cannot express how much he will be missed. Michael is one of those people who would help others before helping himself. He will be leaving behind his beautiful daughter, Millie, and his wife Catherine. Michael could light up a dark room, always making people laugh because of his great personality. Devastated can not come close to how we as a family are feeling. He died doing the job that we Thacker brothers love. He is a true hero. Rest in Peace. See you on the real 're-org' bro. You will always be in my thoughts."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Webb, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh, said:

"Corporal Michael Thacker had all the attributes of a superb Royal Welsh Junior Non Commissioned Officer and he was exactly the man that you would want at your side when life got difficult. He was a soldier's soldier - a larger than life character, highly competent, fiercely loyal and hugely proud of his family.

"He was incredibly good company and always at the centre of whatever was going on. He had a great sense of humour; banter was his speciality and any time spent with him was time well spent.No-one ever left him without a smile on their face - he simply loved life. He was mischievous, fun, incredibly amiable and with a grin that would brighten the darkest of days.

"Recently promoted, he had a bright future in Fire Support Company ahead of him. He was a professional soldier and a natural leader. People were drawn to him and he recognised the role that he had to play. He knew exactly what was needed to bring out the best in those around him. The veteran of an Iraq tour and two previous tours of Afghanistan, he worked very hard to get himself fit for this one after suffering a serious knee injury. And that was the mark of the man; he didn't want to let his mates down. He never shirked a challenge or took the easy option and this selfless commitment spread through those around him."

 

Major John Matthews, Officer Commanding Fire Support Company, 1st Battalion, the Royal Welsh, said:

"I am immensely proud to have known him and I am grateful for the zeal and determination with which he approached soldiering in Fire Support Company. He was a professional and proud Royal Welshman who was fiercely loyal to his men. He was the heart and soul of his team and was always on hand to help when the going got tough. His positive attitude was infectious and his desire to get stuck-in and lead his men was second to none. He had a wicked sense of humour and was never far away when there was banter to be had."

 

Major Charlie Carver, Officer Commanding A Company, 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh, said:

"Corporal Thacker was a true character within the Company Group; full of life and always ready with a cheeky comment. He will be remembered as a highly professional soldier who took enormous pride in his ability as a Fire Support Group Section Commander. He was always to be found at the centre of the action, with his defined sense of humour and his unique outlook on life. Having first met Corporal Thacker when he was a member of the Machine Gun Platoon I have had the pleasure to witness him develop into an outstanding leader whose men liked and respected him in equal measure."

 

He is the 416th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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I would also like to share this poem that I think is very poignant. Some of you may well have read it before and I don't mind telling you that I've read this several times and it still brings a lump to my throat.

 

The Final Inspection

Sergeant Joshua Helterbran

 

The Soldier stood and faced God

Which must always come to pass

He hoped his shoes were shining

Just as bright as his brass.

 

"Step forward you Soldier,

How shall I deal with you?

Have you always turned the other cheek?

To My Church have you been true?

 

"The Solider squared his shoulders and said

"No, Lord, I guess I ain't

Because those of us who carry guns

Can't always be a saint.

 

"I've had to work on Sundays

And at times my talk was tough,

And sometimes I've been violent,

Because the world is awfully rough.

 

But, I never took a penny

That wasn't mine to keep.

Though I worked a lot of overtime

When the bills got just to steep,

 

And I never passed a cry for help

Though at times I shook with fear,

And sometimes, God forgive me,

I've wept unmanly tears.

 

I know I don't deserve a place

Among the people here.

They never wanted me around

Except to calm their fears.

 

If you've a place for me here,

Lord, It needn't be so grand,

I never expected or had too much,

But if you don't, I'll understand.

 

"There was silence all around the throne

Where the saints had often trod

As the Soldier waited quietly,

For the judgment of his God.

 

"Step forward now, you Soldier,

You've borne your burden well.

Walk peacefully on Heaven's streets,

You've done your time in Hell."

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A soldier from 3rd Battalion, the Yorkshire Regiment was killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province by small arms fire today (3rd June 2012).

 

More information as it is received.

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PteGreggStone3YORKS.jpg

Private Gregg Thomas Stone

 

Private Gregg Thomas Stone, 20 years of age, from Hull, was killed during a daring rescue attempt to save an Afghanistan National Police (ANP) commander on Sunday 3rd June 2012. He leaves behind his wife, Samantha, mother, Angela, father, Robert, and brothers Kallum, Jamie and Graeme, and sister, Rosie and Jennie.

 

His wife said in a statement:

"Gregg and I were childhood sweethearts and we met at school and he was my soul-mate. He was a brilliant husband and a family man who loved his family. He was always the one to want to make us laugh and he always cheered everyone up.

"He was proud to be a soldier and for what he had achieved in his work.

"He would also want me to mention his dog Benji who he loved to bits."

 

His family also said:

"He will always be a true hero in all our hearts! Anyone who was blessed enough to have known him will know how much of a credit to his friends and family he was.

"Words cannot begin to describe this great loss, and we are exceptionally proud of Gregg for everything he was, has, and still is.

"Gregg was the kindest, funniest, friendliest, most popular lad that you could wish to meet. This is the saddest loss of our laughing boy."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Zac Stenning, Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, said:

"Today we have lost Private Gregg Stone; a committed professional soldier and our brother in arms, who died protecting the lives of others. Fit and determined, Gregg was a happy outgoing soldier who enthused those around him. He was respected and admired by his fellows, as someone who was totally selfless and cared deeply for others.

"He was not only notable for his military skills but also for his singing prowess and his motocross achievements. His colleagues and friends describe him simply and unequivocally as a 'legend', such was his outgoing and upbeat nature. His hard working attitude and eagerness to soldier, coupled with his friendliness and compassion, made him the perfect Yorkshire Infantry soldier and we are proud and honoured to have served with him."

 

Major Rob Singleton, Officer Commanding, Burma Company, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, said:

"Private Gregg Stone was an exceptional young soldier. He was a loving family man and always cheerful with a smile on his face. He was utterly professional to his core and an example to other soldiers in the Company.

He stood out as a real team player who always made the time to help others."

 

He is the 417th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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On Wednesday the 13th of June, 2012, a soldier from 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards was killed by a grenade and small arms fire in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province. He received first aid but was declared killed in action in the field after succumbing to his wounds.

 

More information as I get it.

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Lance Corporal James Ashworth

 

Lance Corporal James Ashworth, 23 years of age and from Kettering, leaves behind his mother, Kerryann, father, Duane, sisters, Lauren and Paige, brothers Coran and Karl, and girlfriend, Emily.

 

He was killed when he was wounded by a grenade blast and small arms fire on Thursday the 13th June 2012. Despite recieving first aid, he died due to his wounds in the field.

 

His family said in a statement:

"We are devastated by the loss of our son, brother, uncle and boyfriend. He meant the world to everyone and has left an irreplaceable hole in our hearts.

"We ask that we are given time to grieve and we sincerely thank everyone for their condolences."

 

Lieutenant Colonel James Bowder, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, said:

"Lance Corporal Ashworth was an outstanding soldier whose loss has moved us all. A real self-starter, he excelled in everything that he undertook. Fit, strong and brilliant at his job, he set the bar very high. Indeed, such was his calmness under pressure, his charisma, and his selflessness that he made an exemplary junior leader.

"Lance Corporal Ashworth had fitted a great deal into a relatively short time. Having already served with distinction in the Guards' Parachute Platoon, The Queen's Company and then most recently in the Battalion's Reconnaissance Platoon, he was destined to go a long way in the Army.

"Lance Corporal Ashworth's death leaves a hole in the Battalion ??? we have lost one of our very best soldiers."

 

Captain Mike Dobbin, Commander, Recconaisence Platoon, Nijmegen Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, said:

"Lance Corporal Ashworth was killed while fighting his way through compounds; leading his fire team from the front, whilst trying to protect his men and he showed extraordinary courage to close on a determined enemy. His professionalism under pressure and ability to remain calm in what was a chaotic situation is testament to his character.

"Lance Corporal Ashworth was a pleasure to command and I will sorely miss his calming influence on the battlefield. Softly spoken, he stepped up to every task thrown in his direction. As the section Second in Command in the ISAF/Afghan National Army partnered section, Lance Corporal Ashworth regularly commanded the section while the Section Commander worked with the Afghan Army. This he did with absolute professionalism and an ability that surpassed his rank."

"I am humbled by what I saw of Lance Corporal Ashworth's actions and will never forget him."

 

He is the 418th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

 

 

 

Edit:

On 16th March 2013, Lance Corporal James Ashworth was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously for his actions in Afghanistan, where he shielded his fire team from a grenade blast.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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