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Evans D

Fallen Servicemen and Women

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A soldier from 1 Royal Anglian was killed in Afghanistan yesterday (Friday the 15th June 2012) by enemy action.

 

More information as it comes.

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So I've got no excuse for not writing this sooner... I feel really bad, not least because he's from my home city...

 

CplGuy.JPG

Corporal Alex Guy

 

Corporal Alex Guy, 37, from Norwich, was killed on Friday 15th June 2012 in the Nad 'Ali district of Helmand Province. He leaves behind his wife, Emma, mother and father, Aileen and Andrew, and sisters, Rebecca and Martha.

 

His mother said:

"Alex was born on Friday 13th September 1974 at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital into a military family, as the family was stationed at RAF Coltishall at the time. We went to live in St. Neots in 1979 and Alex went to Bushmead Infant School in 1980.

"He was a happy, friendly child who loved joining in with any activities ? in and out of school. He went to Ernulf Community School (now Academy) in 1986. As a teenager he was in the St. Neots RAF Cadets and loved it.

"He left school in 1991 and eventually decided to join the Army in 1992. The comradeship and discipline and ?sense of family? meant everything to him.

"He was a wonderful and loving son, husband, brother, friend and comrade."

 

His wife said:

"Alex was kind. A happy, full-of-life and kind hearted man, with a passion for his work and family."

 

His mother-in-law said:

"A gentle, kind-hearted, generous, much-missed son-in-law who was devoted to our daughter."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Aston, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment "The Vikings", said:

"A loyal, committed and thoroughly decent man, Corporal Alex Guy was a unique member of the Vikings. His honest, welcoming approach and impressive operational pedigree saw him achieve the ideal balance between good friend, wise mentor and tough commander. In his section he had forged a strong team which he led through the most dangerous of situations with nothing other than courage, selfless commitment and utter professionalism.

"When things got difficult Corporal Guy was exactly the person you would want by your side; he would quietly revel in the responsibility and never you let down. It is these attributes that have defined his career over the last 19 years and will remain in the memory of his fellow Vikings.

 

Major Bevis Allen, Officer Commanding, D (Cambridgeshire) Company, 1st Battalion, the Royal Anglian Regiment, said:

"Corporal Alex Guy was the epitome of a Viking soldier; professional, dedicated, brave, and dependable, yet also self-effacing, modest and approachable to even the most newly-arrived soldiers. I had the privilege of serving in the same platoon as Corporal Guy on two operational tours a decade ago, where he and I were both crew members in the same armoured vehicle. As such I got to know him very well and it was such a genuine pleasure to return to the Vikings and see his friendly face, dishing out a banter-filled welcome back to the Company.

"I knew that no matter what the odds on the upcoming tour of Afghanistan, I had in him an NCO who could be trusted to tackle the most challenging of tasks, remaining cool under pressure and resolute in the attack, yet compassionate and mindful of his soldiers? welfare.

"Corporal Guy?s tragic loss leaves a huge gap in our team. He was one of the true stalwarts of D (Cambridgeshire) Company. I hope some small comfort can be taken from the fact that he died doing the job he loved, surrounded by his Viking brothers, who held him in such high esteem."

 

Corporal David Evans, Lance Corporal Gareth Waghorne, Private Elvis Bell, Drummer Craig Everett, Drummer Stuart Harris, Private Paul Johnson, Private Mark Sellors and Private Bethold Tjhero, members of Corporal Guy's Fire Support Section, D(Cambridgeshire) Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, said:

"Those who knew Corporal Alex Guy would understand how much his death has been felt by each of us. Alex was a very experienced and highly motivated soldier, and he struck the perfect balance of being our leader, our mentor and our friend. As a leader he held us together through some difficult times, and kept us focussed. He was always willing to share his knowledge with others, especially the newest members of his section. When the team came together shortly before the tour Alex took the time to find out more about everyone he was working with, which we appreciated. Most of all, Alex was supportive, helpful, and someone we could trust.

?Alex will never be forgotten. He always managed to make people laugh with his sense of humour, and he has left behind only happy memories."

 

He is the 419th member of the British Armed Forces to have been killed in the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them...

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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On the 1st Jully 2012, 3 British soldiers were killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province.

 

2 soldiers were from 1st Battalion Welsh Guards and 1 from the Royal Corps of Signals.

 

They were attending a shura and as they were leaving the checkpoint that the shura was being held near, a man wearing an Afghanistan National Police uniform open fired on them. All 3 were seriously wounded and despite receiving first aid treatment they died of their wounds.

 

More information as I receive it.

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Bad enough being shot at by Taliban, but when it's the ANP (or at least someone dressed as ANP) you wonder if that place really deserves our help. I hope for the sake of those soldiers that we lost that we've got good reason to be there.

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We will remember them all from the start till the end

I take my hat off to you Evans on your stirling work on this saddest of all our topics

Keep it up mate its the least we as a community can do to show our appreciation for our forces abroad

Edited by Pte Speer

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Fuck that shit. It's bad enough they are shot at by insurgents and Taliban - but losing good men to someone they are working to help? As far as I'm concerned, the ISAF forces are doing the ANA's and the ANP's jobs.

 

Just read the story and came straight on here. 12 hour day at the Coy with 3 hours sleep last night, as if I wasn't on edge already. Then this story pops up to be the cherry on my crap sundae.

 

We will bloody well remember them!

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Thomas_Roderick_Tuisovurua.jpg

Warrant Officer Class 2 Leonard Thomas, Guardsman Craig Roderick, Guardsman Apete Tuisovurua

 

 

 

 

 

WO2 Leonard Thomas, 45 years of age, leaves behind his mother, Sylvia, his partner, Rachel (also a member of 37 Signal Regiment (Volunteers) ), and younger brother Tristan.

 

His family made the following statement:

"Pez was a military man through and through. He thrived in extreme environments, both in the military and in his spare time.

"He was a keen climber and mountaineer and will be sorely missed by everyone who had the privilege to have met him."

 

Colonel Alan Richmond, Late Queens Royal Dragoon Guards, Commander, Military Stabilisation Support Group, said:

"Warrant Officer Class 2 'Pez' Thomas was a soldier of great experience, wisdom and dedication.

"A proud member of 37 Signal Regiment (Volunteers), with 15 years of regular military service behind him, 'Pez' became interested in the activities of the Military Stabilisation Support Group whilst supporting its training. Yearning for a final military deployment, he volunteered to serve with the Group where his presence, passion and experience helped bind together an eclectic team drawn from all sections of the Armed Forces.

"The toughest jobs are given to most able and 'Pez' was deployed to a challenging area of Helmand. There he acted as a Stabilisation Operator; striving to enhance the lives of the people by improving local governance, infrastructure and basic services. It was whilst working tirelessly to build the foundations for a lasting peace that he was so tragically struck down alongside cherished colleagues from the Welsh Guards.

"The Military Stabilisation Support Group mourns the loss of a much valued and respected comrade. For our small tight-knit team in Helmand the grief will be most acute but the loss will undoubtedly strengthen our resolve to get back out and continue his selfless work."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Nigel Allison, Royal Logistic Corps, SO1 Transition, Headquarters Task Force Helmand, said:

"Warrant Officer Class 2 Thomas will be remembered by the Officers and Senior Non-Commissioned Officers of the Military Stabilisation Support Group (Afghanistan) as a highly professional, passionate and forthright soldier who was genuinely driven by a desire to make a difference.

"A consummate Warrant Officer he was hardworking, hugely experienced, possessed a keen sense of humour and was rightly proud of his prestigious military career, the majority of which was spent as a member of the Welsh Guards. A measure of the type of man he was is the fact that he had willingly volunteered for one last operational deployment, having spent two and a half years on Full Time Reserve Service working in the Counter-Improvised Explosive Device area within Headquarters Army. On deployment to Afghanistan he then volunteered to be the Military Stabilisation Support Team Operator within Combined Force Burma due to his prior experience as an Infantry Senior Non-Commissioned Officer.

"Warrant Officer Class 2 Thomas persevered in his pursuit to improve the lives of Afghans living in this area and to help connect them to official government structures.

"The Military Stabilisation Support Group (Afghanistan), his colleagues and friends will miss his wit, healthy cynicism and good company."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dominique Cairns, Commanding Officer, 37 Signal regiment (Volunteers), said:

"Warrant Officer Class 2 Thomas was a dedicated and professional soldier who was a long standing member of the Army in many roles, both as a regular soldier and reservist. He will be remembered for his lively sense of humour and incredible enthusiasm. He took immense pride in passing on his wealth of knowledge to recruits and colleagues alike who will join us all in the deep sadness and sense of loss that we feel. He was an immensely proud and professional soldier who will be sorely missed by all that knew him."

 

 

 

 

 

Guardsman Craig Roderick, 22 years of age, from Cardiff, leaves behind his parents, Mike and Sadie, two sisters, Katie and Lucinda Emily, Step-Brother, Jay, Grandmother, Margaret, and girlfriend, Zoe.

 

His family made the following statement:

"Words cannot describe how the loss of our precious Craig has affected us all. The vast void left by this tragedy will never be filled.

"Everyone who knew him will miss his big smile and his sense of humour. He was the best son, brother or friend you could have wished for, we were privileged to have known him. He will always be missed and never forgotten."

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dino Bossi, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"Guardsman Craig Roderick died doing the job that he loved ??? he had joined the Army expressly to go to Afghanistan and was in his element out here thriving on the austere conditions, the hard physical work and the mental challenge of soldiering. He was an integral and much loved member of a close-knit team. Always keen on his fitness Guardsman Roderick could be relied upon to be at the front of any physical task or endurance event.

"Here in Afghanistan that stood him in excellent stead and he revelled in being able to overcome adversity. Brave, honest and loyal, he was the sort of man anyone would be glad to have in his fire-trench when the going got tough. Cardiff City was an enduring passion, but his Police Advisor Team, was the team he supported most fervently and with unremitting pride.

"Cymru am Byth!"

 

Major Julian Salusbury, Company Commander, Number 2 Company, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"Soon after arriving in the Battalion, Guardsman Roderick was identified as an excellent young soldier. Fit and energetic, he was a proud guardsman with a bright future. Quite simply, there was never a dull moment with Guardsman Roderick. He threw himself into his life as a soldier and worked and played hard. Generous, friendly and one of the boys, he was always the first to confidently offer me a shot of tequila on a Company night out. He was much liked and will be sorely missed.

"Guardsmen Roderick worked hard throughout Mission Specific Training to learn the skills needed to deploy on an operational tour. He said that he joined the Army so that he could go to Afghanistan - he relished the chance for adventure. He was employed in the demanding Police Advisory role requiring the utmost patience and professionalism - Guardsman Roderick displayed both with aplomb. His honest, straightforward and inclusive nature endeared him to his Afghan partners: he was a key part of the team.

"Guardsman Roderick well understood the inherent risks of being a soldier - his death is keenly felt by his brother guardsmen in Number 2 Company. Guardsman Roderick, without doubt, made a difference to the daily lives of the ordinary Helmandi people and, knowing this, we continue with our mission - we have made a difference and will continue to do so."

 

 

 

 

 

Guardsman Apete Tuisovura, 29 years of age, from Fiji, leaves behind his mother, father, four brothers and 3 sisters.

 

Lieutenant Colonel Dino Bossi, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"Guardsman Apete Tuisovurua was a gentle and decent man who was defined by his love of sport, his uplifting company and his willingness to go out of his way to help anyone. One of Nature's true gentlemen, he had a deeply moral outlook on life and enduring principles by which he lived. He was extremely fit and robust but without show or arrogance. Everybody liked him ??? one could not fail to ??? and his infectious smile broke down barriers wherever he went.

"His ambition was to be selected to play for the Battalion's First XV rugby team, turning up to training regularly though he knew he would struggle to make the cut. He played for the love of the sport and for the friends that he won on the pitch and off it. Guardsman Tuisovurua was an intensely loyal man who was very much part of his team. He leaves a gap in its ranks as he does in that of his Company and of the wider Welsh Guards.

"We hope that God gives them [his family] the strength to endure their grief and the knowledge that Apete died in a just cause doing his duty with pride, honour and skill. We will remember him. Cymru am Byth!"

 

Major Julian Salusbury, Company Commander, Number 2 Company, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, said:

"Guardsman Tuisovurua had only been with 1st Battalion Welsh Guards for a little over a year but had proved himself to be dedicated, loyal and thoroughly decent. In his own words, he joined the Army to be 'disciplined and truthful to himself'; he was all of this and more.

"[He] was a quiet, hard working and willing guardsman. He enjoyed life as a soldier and made many friends in the Company. A committed rugby player, fit and eager to learn, he was a pleasure to command. It was his selflessness, ready smile and unfailing courtesy that caught the eye - he approached everyone the same and earned wide respect. Guardsman Tuisovurua was keen to progress in the Army - I have no doubt that he had a bright future.

"He looked forward to deployment to Afghanistan in the challenging Police Advisory role. His kind, friendly and relaxed approach ensured an immediate rapport with the Afghan Police. Determined to tackle any task given to him, he had steely determination and was an absolutely reliable and key member of his Police Advisory Team.

"Guardsman Tuisovurua's death has hit us all hard in Number 2 Company but we are determined to continue to defeat the enemy. Acts like this bring us closer to our Afghan National Security Force brothers. The differences Guardsman Tuisovurua made to security for the ordinary Helmandi people are felt daily."

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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It's been nice not writing in this topic for a while, but the cruel law of averages and reality has once again crept into our thoughts.

 

On 10th August 2012 a soldier from 3rd Battalion, The Rifles, was killed in Afghanistan. He was killed due to enemy action whilst on patrol in the Nad-E Ali district of Helmand Province.

 

More information as I receive it.

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Another serviceman, from the Royal Engineers, was also killed today in the Nad-e-Ali district while undertaking construction tasks. More to follow.

Rest In Peace.

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Cheers Odell, I didn't catch that one until I got to work. I'll put their tributes up here when the information comes out.

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No worries mate, I admire the effort you put into making sure these men are remembered as they should be. I'll keep checking for other info as and when it's released.

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AndrewChesterman.jpg

Lieutenant Andrew Chesterman

 

Lieutenant Andrew Chesterman, 36 years of age, from Guildford, leaves behind his father, Paul, and sisters, Anna and Olivia.

 

His father made the following statement on behalf of his family:

"We have lost a fine young man. It was readily apparent that Andrew gave himself fully and wholeheartedly to his career in 3 Rifles.

 

"At a Battalion Dinner shortly before Op Herrick 16, I was proud to see his easy, close and well accepted rapport with his fellow young officers.

 

He was killed after an IED struck the lead vehicle in a patrol he was commanding. He moved forwards to take control of the situation the patrol came under small arms fire from insurgents and he was shot in the ensuing fire fight. Despite his soldiers admistering first aid, the emergency medical response team and the staff at Camp Bastion's hospital, he could not be saved.

 

"Andrew was accomplished in many areas. He developed a skill to play both the trombone and piano, graduated with a Masters Degree in Engineering, qualified as a Mountain Leader, enjoyed working as team yacht racing and was proficient on skis. His family are immensely proud of him and will carry him very dearly in their hearts."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Charlie Maconochie, Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, said:

"Lieutenant Andrew Chesterman will be remembered by all Officers and Riflemen of 3rd Battalion, The Rifles as an outstanding leader of men who epitomised what it means to be a Rifleman. Professional excellence, self-discipline, integrity and loyalty are characteristics that immediately spring to mind when I think about Andrew. He was always extremely personable, charming, and very charismatic with an ever present sharp sense of humour and wit. We are all the richer for having had the privilege and honour to have served alongside such a talented and popular young Officer.

 

"His Riflemen clearly adored and utterly respected Andrew not least as he always led from the front, was fiercely fit and set the highest possible personal example. And he did all this in the most challenging of combat environments here in Helmand Province. It was clear he put his Riflemen first and he directed all his energy into developing and making them even more effective. I also admired the way he would passionately fight their corner, no matter what the issue.

 

"Andrew Chesterman will be remembered as a hugely charismatic, completely dedicated and thoroughly professional Officer who was destined for a great career in the Army. Of that I have no doubt. He will be greatly missed by his brother officers and Riflemen alike and his sacrifice never forgotten."

 

 

Major Bob Hobbs, Officer Commanding C Company, 3rd Battalion, The Rifles, said:

"Lieutenant Andrew Chesterman was a natural infantry officer and leader of men. I feel that he was part of our lives in C Company for much longer than the 15 months he served alongside us; such was his positive impact on us all. He was an officer of considerable talent, drive, energy and commitment who strove to do the best for his Riflemen no matter the situation. He was a thoughtful and intelligent man who dedicated time and academic rigour to understanding the challenges that we faced and he always saw a solution to them. He always led from the front ??? he was ruthlessly fit and I have many memories of seeing him quickly disappear over the brow of a hill at the front of the pack while I still laboured up the climb. He was a pleasure to be around and a thoroughly decent man.

 

"During this summer, Andrew was selected to fulfil one of the most demanding of tasks in serving as a Police Advisory Team commander and he set about this task with the vigour and tenacity I had come to expect but never tired of being impressed by. He saw through the obstacles that would deter a lesser man and dedicated himself and his team to the betterment of the Afghan Police; they have lost a brother in arms as well. He was right to pride himself on the level of professionalism he asked of his Riflemen, underwritten by the highest personal standards that he set and exceeded himself. This legacy will endure with them, and us all, beyond his service and sacrifice.

 

 

 

He is the 423rd British casualty in the Afghanistan conflict so far.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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CplSmith.jpg

Lance Corporal Matthew "Smudge" Smith

 

Lance Corporal Matthew Smith, 26 years of age, from Aldershot (born in Hong Kong), leaves behind his mother, Caroline, father, Kenneth, fianc?e, Laura, brother Bradley, and four children, Lannie, Ella, Tilli and Jai, who are aged between 1 and 7 years.

 

He was killed as a result of enemy action. He was helping to construct a checkpoint near a river when he was engaged and shot by insurgents. Despite the first aid he received and the attention of a medical helicopter crew, he sadly died of his wounds.

 

His mother said in a statement:

"A loving father to four beautiful children, who will be dearly missed by his fianc?e, mother, father, family and friends. Our Hero RIP."

 

Lieutenant Colonel John Ridge, Commanding Officer, 26 Engineer Regiment, said:

 

"Lance Corporal Smith embodied everything that is great about the Corps of Royal Engineers. He was incredibly hard working, completely selfless and utterly professional. Killed whilst building a vital checkpoint on the Nahr-e-Bughra Canal, he died at the centre of the task, leading, as always, from the front.

 

"I last saw Lance Corporal Smith a few weeks ago. He briefed me on what his team were up to, and on the tasks that they had still to do before the end of the tour. He was clearly loving the job, and the experience of leading on operations. After four months of hard physical work, I expected to find his soldiers tired and looking forward to getting home. Instead, they were in high spirits and focussed on what jobs were coming up next. There could be no better proof of his outstanding leadership.

 

"Lance Corporal Smith joined the Corps of Royal Engineers in 2003, and he was posted to 26 Engineer Regiment in January 2010. Tremendously proud to be a sapper, he reportedly woke his tent mates to a recording or rendition of "Hurrah for the CRE", the Corps song, most mornings.

 

"We have all been terribly shocked by his death, particularly his mates from 6 Troop. They are a tight knit team, and he was a key player, whether making the early morning brews, or raising a smile when the endless building of patrol base walls finally started eating into morale.

 

"After Lance Corporal Smith had been shot, and his section had evacuated him to medical assistance, they went straight back to site and finished the job that he had started. After being informed of his death, they prepared to build the next checkpoint. Not through a lack of feeling, but because this is exactly what he would have wanted them to do."

 

 

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Aston MC, Commanding Officer, Transition Support Unit Nad-e Ali, said:

 

"Lance Corporal Smith was a standout character: engaging, charismatic, full of life and above all else a proud Sapper and committed family man. In the Nad-e Ali Transition Support Unit of nearly 1350 soldiers he was a shining light to all who knew him. Within his troop he was always the first to offer an opinion and would do so with a charming confidence that made him instantly likeable. An all round decent man, you could not help but be engaged by his banter, intellect and work ethic. It was evident that he was a huge presence amongst his friends who admired his self-belief, great sense of humour and humble approach.

 

"In the short period I knew him, I was struck by his energy and love of soldiering which was only surpassed by the love he held for his fianc?e and children whom he often talked about. A character like Lance Corporal Smith is impossible to replace ? he was one of a kind."

 

He is the 424th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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My Aunt was killed in Iraq in 2006 first female British soldier to be killed out there, Seeing this thread brings a tear to my eye's fr all tho service men and women who have given there life's, Thank you guys for your service to us and our country. She was SSG Sharon Elliot

 

And thank you guys for showing your decency not many units do this.

Edited by Howard

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I'm sorry to hear that Howard. We all remember the sacrifice and effort made by those brave men, but we must also never forget the equally brave women who also give so much.

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My deepest sympathy and support goes to the bereaved and colleagues of these brave warriors who gave their lives and the thousands of wounded who suffer every day with the scars of war.

Forever remembered never forgotten.

 

There is a beautiful poem about lost danish soldiers but this goes for every fallen serviceman and women, we fight together and die together.

I tried to translate:

The sound of wings beats the air in pieces again Valkyries back.

Brave and proud never with weak eyes they show the proud Danes that remains.

Brother lost friend lost, but his eyes are firm, the glory of battle must not be taken from those who go to Valhalla.

Rest in peace

Edited by Pte Baago

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On Friday 17th August 2012, a soldier from 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards was killed in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province due to enemy action.

 

More information as I receive it.

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GdsmShadrake.jpg

Guardsman Jamie Shadrake

 

Guardsman Jamie Shadrake, 20 years of age, from Wrexham, Wales, leaves behind his parents, Cathryn and Philip, brothers, Carl, Kieran and Shane, and sister, Kerry-Anne.

 

He was manning a checkpoint when it came under attack from insurgents and he died of wounds, despite first aid being administered.

 

His family made the following statement:

"Jamie was a tremendous son and brother. He was proud to be a soldier and died doing a job that he loved. We are all devastated by the loss of Jamie who was such a loving son and brother.

"We are very proud of the fact that Jamie was prepared to do his duty in helping the people of Afghanistan.

"Jamie lit up any room with his infectious smile. He will be sorely missed by so many who loved him."

 

Lieutenant Colonel James Bowder, Commanding Officer 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards, said:

"Guardsman Shadrake was an extraordinary young man. Bright, committed and imbued with boundless energy, his enthusiasm and lust for life were infectious. He was a talented soldier with a huge amount to offer and would have gone a long way in the Army. Indeed, he was determined to do so, not least in order to impress his elder brother who is a Platoon Sergeant in the Battalion.

"He will never be forgotten and we are determined to finish the mission that he so courageously helped to start."

 

Captain Mike Dobbin, platoon commander of the Elite Reconnaissance Platoon (Jamie Shadrake's platoon), said:

"Having celebrated his 20th birthday days before [14th August 1992], Guardsman Shadrake was among the youngest in the Platoon. Full of energy, enthusiasm and a sense of humour, he was a key ingredient in this tight knit unit. Having spent his operational tour conducting many dangerous missions, he had risen to every challenge with his usual bright spirit.

"Losing both a soldier with so much potential and a man with such a personality has left a gaping hole in the platoon."

 

 

 

 

He is the 425th British casualty of the Afghanistan conflict.

 

We will remember them.

Edited by Pte Knudsen

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Dutch citizen,

 

Lance Corporal Jacinda Baker (26)(dutch) , Private Richard Harris (21) and Corporal Luke Tamatea (31).

 

 

The group were travelling in the last vehicle in a convoy was hit by an improvised explosive device in Bamiyan about 9.20pm local time.

 

RIP

Edited by Gulbitti

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I know a friend from the Netherlands. Dutch Para, don't remember his unit though.

 

Someone send me a message should anyone by the name of "Bas" show up.

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Again, it's been nice not to write in this thread...

 

Recently a soldier from 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards has died of wounds he sustained while serving in Afghanistan. Details so far are that he was in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province when he sustained his wounds due to enemy fire on the 14th of August 2012. He was flown back to Bastion and then on to England where he survived until today, the 7th September 2012.

 

More details as I receive them.

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